a healthier cream of mushroom soup

I’ve been craving some good old fashioned cream of mushroom soup for weeks.

 a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

When I was growing up I had two working parents, so a lot of my afternoons were spent at my grandmother’s house out in the country in upstate New York. We always ate really well (too well, probably) at Grandma’s house, and lunch was always a big deal. Soup and sandwiches was a pretty popular lunch time menu, but I hated tomatoes when I was young so mushroom soup (from a can of course) was how I rolled.

I don’t know what kid likes mushrooms but not tomatoes, but what can I say. I was a weird kid I guess.

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

When I think of all the gorgeous tomatoes that I missed out on, grown in the bright sunshine of my grandfather’s garden, it makes my heart ache. What was wrong with me? What a sad boring life I led.

One of my great grandmother’s favorite lunches in the summer was a thick-sliced fresh tomato sandwich on white bread with a little mayonnaise and a generous sprinkle of salt. I, however, usually opted for velveeta grilled cheese (baked, not fried) with a bowl of cream of mushroom soup.

Mushroom soup has always felt like a perfect comfort food ever since.

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

I recently dug around for recipes to satisfy my mushroom soup cravings, but I was stopped dead in my tracks by how heavy most of them sounded. I’m sure you know by now that I’m not shy about using real butter and cream, but Jeez Louise! One recipe, from my best-friend-in-my-head Ina Garten, called for a whole stick of butter, a cup of half and half, and a cup of heavy cream!

I knew there had to be a way to make a silky, creamy, rich & hearty cream of mushroom soup without using that much dairy and fat, but was having a hard time figuring it out. Then a friend at work reminded me that I already know the perfect secret ingredient!

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

Aaaaaaaaawwwwwhhhhh! Look at how that beauty glows! Can you hear the angels singing?

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

I’ve already used this trick before, when making corn chowder this summer, and I guess I somehow just forgot about it. When I was whining about how heavy and fattening homemade cream of mushroom soup was, my friend was like, why don’t you just do that roasted cauliflower trick?

Duh!

Roasting cauliflower in the oven, rather than boiling it with the rest of the soup, keeps it from tasting cabbage-y, and once pureed super smooth, it adds an unbelievably silky texture that you’d truly never guess didn’t come from cream thickened with a roux. I don’t even understand how or why this works so well, but it really does.

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

I wasn’t intending to make a vegetarian or vegan cream of mushroom soup, just a lighter version, so I went ahead and kept the chicken stock and (some of) the butter. I also intended to add in just a bit of milk or cream at the end, but once the roasted cauliflower was pureed in, I realized I didn’t even need to. With that in mind, I now realize that it would be really easy to make this soup vegan if you want to. Just substitute olive oil or coconut oil for the butter, and vegetable (preferably mushroom) stock for the chicken stock. Since cauliflower is the only thickening agent, this soup also happens to be totally gluten free!

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

This soup is just what the doctor ordered. It’s so earthy and rich and… mushroomy. Using three varieties of flavorful mushrooms makes sure that every bit packs a serious punch. White wine adds a luxe floral note, fresh thyme compliments the woodsy earthiness of the mushrooms, and fresh parsley finishes the soup with bright green herbal flavor. While this recipe is healthier than most, I would never call it a “diet” or “light” recipe because it tastes way too good to be “health food”, and because it does still call for a good bit of butter and olive oil.

Thanks to the pureed roasted cauliflower, this soup feels every bit as rich and satisfying as you could hope. Some of the mushrooms are pureed too, but I like to reserve a few so you get some meaty bites of them every so often. You can use an immersion blender or a standing blender to puree the soup, but I will say that a standing blender seems to get the soup just a bit more smooth and silky. I used an immersion blender though, because it works almost as well and just seems safer, easier, and less messy.

a healthier cream of mushroom soup | Brooklyn Homemaker

A Healthier Cream of Mushroom Soup

2 Tbsp olive oil (divided)
1 small head of cauliflower
salt and pepper to taste
3 Tbsp butter (or coconut or olive oil if desired)
2 1/2 pounds mixed mushrooms (I used cremini, portabello, & shiitake)
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1 cup dry white wine
4 cups chicken stock  (or vegetable or mushroom stock)
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley

Preheat oven to 400 F. Roughly chop cauliflower into large florets. Toss in 1 tablespoon of olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and arrange in an even layer on a parchment lined baking sheet. Roast for 30 minutes and set aside to cool.

Meanwhile, roughly chop your mushrooms, removing and discarding any thick woody stems (especially the stems of portabello and shiitake). Heat butter and remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium high heat in a large thick-bottomed pot. Once the butter is sizzling, add the mushrooms and thyme, lightly season with salt and pepper, and stir to coat. Cook the mushrooms until they have released most of their liquid. Remove two cups of the cooked mushrooms, letting liquid drain back into pot, and set aside.
Add the onions and the garlic, and cook for about a minute. Add the white wine, chicken stock, and half of the chopped parsley. Bring to a simmer and cook, uncovered, for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and add the roasted cauliflower.
Using an immersion blender or working in batches with a standing blender, purée the soup until completely smooth and silky. Return the pot to the stove, add the reserved cooked mushrooms and remaining chopped fresh parsley. If the soup is too thick, add a bit more stock to thin to the desired thickness. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary and bring back up to a simmer before serving.

Whisk & Hammer

I want to do something a little different today.
There will be no recipe in this post. No mouthwatering food photos.

I recently made a little change to my logo, maybe you noticed? (up top ^^^)
Anyway, it got me to thinking about what my humble little logo is meant to represent. Brace yourself. I’m about to start rambling.

When I started Brooklyn Homemaker I knew that I wanted to talk about food, like, a lot, because I love food and I’ve always spent a lot of my time cooking food and eating food and thinking about food and talking about food.

Food isn’t my only love though. I also love good interior (and exterior) design, home decor, home restoration projects, and DIY. I spend more hours than I’d like to admit reading home improvement blogs and building my dream home on Pinterest. I’ve put a significant investment in time and money fixing up our current space, and I’ve spent even more time dreaming about what more I could do. Nothing would make me happier than eventually buying and fixing up my own home somewhere, but that’s likely a long way off.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

When I was just getting started with this blog, I wanted my interest in design and DIY to play a part in the subject matter here right along with the recipes and food porn. Way back when, I did publish a handful of posts talking about our apartment and our garden, but for the most part, the bulk of my time and energy has gone into the food aspect of this “lifestyle” blog.

I’m incredibly self critical, and when I first started doing this whole blogging thing my photography had an amateurish quality that I just couldn’t deal with, even though I knew that I was in fact an amateur and just needed time to learn the ropes. With self improvement in mind, I focused most of my energy on food photography and teaching myself about my camera settings, white balance, photo editing, lighting, food styling, prop collecting, blah blah blah. While I know I still have a lot to learn and a long way to go, I’m finally pretty happy with the way things have been looking around here.

While food will likely always be the main focus of Brooklyn Homemaker, I think I might be ready to bring just a little bit more hammer into the experience.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

I’ve said this before, but the bulk of the work needed in our apartment was done in the first few weeks after (and even before) we moved in, back before I called myself a blogger. We painted every surface in the joint back then, because just before we moved in the landlord found the least expensive, most incapable numbskulls he could, to do the worst paint job I’ve ever seen in my life. I’m actually pretty certain that they didn’t even use actual paint, but only primer, to slap up a patchy uneven coat without bothering to first remove any thumbtacks or patch any nail holes. We arranged the lease so that we could get our keys two weeks before moving in, just to give ourselves time to scrape the primer splatters off the hardwood floors, patch the swiss cheese drywall, and put some actual paint on the walls and ceilings.

Even with all the work we’ve already done, one space that I’ve never really been happy with is our kitchen. Over a year ago I repainted the backsplash with chalkboard paint in an attempt to make the space feel a little more chic and modern, and for a while I was happy with the change, but it wasn’t enough and I still kind of hate that room.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

As tiny as it is, space isn’t really the issue. I actually kind of like a tight kitchen because everything is within reach. The real issue in there (for me) is cosmetic. I hate the cabinets. The finish on them is super yellow, and they take up so much of the wall surface that they tend to cast a yellow tint on everything else. The countertops are also horrible, made of a cheap faux granite laminate that has swelled and warped at the seams near the sink where water has gotten underneath them. I’d also love to have a real tile backsplash instead of the chalkboard painted surface that looks okay but as an actual backsplash isn’t really all that functional or easily cleaned.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

Our landlord truly doesn’t give half a crap what we do in here as long as we pay rent every month, so I’m fortunate enough to be able to realistically dream about doing more. Whatever I do in there will be done to a much higher standard than he would do himself anyway, because I care much more about the quality and longevity of our living space than he does or ever will. The only thing that’s stopped me so far is the thought of putting time and equity into someone else’s property.

We’ve lived here for about four years, and since our apartment is rent stabilized, we’re realistically not going anywhere for a good long time. In the name of comfort and standard of living, I think I’ve finally accepted that putting a few more bucks into our apartment is worth it to me to make us feel more at home.

While my plans are still unclear and I’m not actually tackling any projects just yet, I wanted to discuss my thoughts with all of you today.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

The first thing, and probably the cheapest and easiest, I’d like to do is replace the cheap Ikea shelves we installed when we moved in with something more solid. The current metal rod shelves have an uneven surface that’s resulted in more than a few broken jars. There’s also plenty of room to the right for them to extend at least another foot.

I’m also thinking about trying to find an actual base cabinet to put in instead of the small rolling cart under the shelves. I’m hoping I might be able to find something sturdy and cheap on craigslist or something, but Home Depot has unfinished options that I consider to be in my price range too so I may just go that route.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

I’d also really like to paint our kitchen cabinets. It’d be a a lot of work because I’d want to do it right and wash, strip, sand, prime, and paint them with an oil based lacquer that would wear well, clean easily, and be water and stain resistant. I cannot decide if I’d want to paint them all white or if I might go two tone with grey cabinets on the bottom and white uppers. I think all white could look more classic and potentially less “trendy”, but I think grey base cabinets look very stylish and would probably be easier to keep looking clean. I think some decent under cabinet lighting would probably be a good idea at some point too.

I also think I would like to tile my backsplash and cover up the chalkboard paint. White subway tiles are timeless and classic, easy to install, and can be bought for a song. My only worry is that they’d look out of place butted up against our horrible countertops.

Oh the countertops. This is where I’m totally freaking clueless. What I’d like to do, vs. what I actually feel comfortable spending on someone else’s property are two entirely different things. Even the tiny amount of counter space we have works out to several hundreds of dollars to replace if we went with solid surface stone, so I think that’s definitely out. But what should I do? Just deal with them as is? Replacing them with wood is more affordable than stone, but I worry about how it’d hold up around the sink. I’ve thought about doing some kind of DIY stainless steel or copper countertops, but I don’t have the right tools and they’d be just as significant an investment as the countertop materials themselves. I’ve also seen some great DIY concrete skim-coated countertop tutorials that look easy enough but I question their durability. These countertops are definitely the biggest mental stumbling block I run into when I try to reimagine our kitchen as it’s best possible self.

Brooklyn Homemaker ugly kitchen tour

What do you think about all this?

Should I quit worrying about the hammer and stick with the whisk? Would you like to see more DIY and decor projects, or do you think they’d muddy your idea of what Brooklyn Homemaker is supposed to be?

Should I just stop whining and live with the ugly kitchen as is? Or do you also think the kitchen would look nicer with painted cabinets? Should I go all white or two toned? Do you have any ideas on how best to deal with my horrible and past-their-prime countertops? Do you think new crisp white subway tiles would look chic, or would they be out of place and ridiculous sitting against the ugly laminate? Am I just rambling on like a crazy person who should just leave well enough alone? I desperately need your help!

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze #bundtbakers

I’ve been in a bit of a funk so far this year, and I think the first BundtBakers of 2015 is just the thing to pull me out of it.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

The theme this month, chosen by the amazing Terri of Love and Confections, is Coconut! What better inspiration to get me back into the swing of things than a delicious and versatile tropical fruit? Thank you Terri! I needed that!!!

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

The first thing that I thought of when I saw this month’s theme was an idea I had last year for a cake that didn’t really pan out the first time around.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

The theme in June of last year was “tropical”, and at the time I was going through a bit of an Asian food phase. I thought it could be really fun and interesting to try to translate the savory flavors of tropical southeast asian Thai curry into a sweet bundt cake, so I went to work experimenting. I love Thai coconut curries with lime and ginger, so I used that flavor profile as my inspiration for a bundt with coconut, lime, and ginger as the stars of the show. I also really wanted to see how far I could push the idea of Thai curry in dessert form, so I wanted to use some curry paste too.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

Thai curry paste usually consists of things like lemongrass, kaffir lime, galangal (a spicy Asian type of ginger), chilies, and spices. If I had an unlimited source of time and money I probably would have made my own paste using these classic Thai ingredients. Although these flavors might be sort of unusual and unexpected in a cake, I think it could have worked out really well.

Without unlimited time and money though, I decided to grab a jar of store-bought Thai green curry paste which, unfortunately, also contains ingredients like shallots and garlic. Needless to say, shallots and garlic don’t really work well in desserts, even if you’re trying to be inventive and avant-garde.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

I knew the minute my experimental bundt came out of the oven that something wasn’t right. Despite having only used two teaspoons of curry paste, when I opened the oven door the first thing that hit my nose was garlic. The flavor of the cake wasn’t quite as off as the smell, but that hint of garlic and shallot was still lurking in the background of every bite.

There were a few elements of the cake that worked really well, especially the flavor combination of coconut and lime, and the spicy Thai chili infused lime glaze that I used on top. In the end though, I decided to ditch the idea, and a few days later I came up with a hibiscus lime bundt that was met with rave reviews.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

Fast forward to 2015, and I’ve finally found a good reason to revisit that ill-fated Thai curry cake. I decided to forego the curry paste altogether, and I actually skipped the ginger too. I knew that I loved the combination of lime and coconut, so this time I toasted the coconut and paired it with coconut milk and lime zest and juice.

As a nod to the Thai cake, I decided to keep the chili infused lime glaze. Thai bird’s beak chilies are SUPER spicy, so a little goes a long way to add a nice heat to this sweet glaze. I sliced a few chilies in half and steeped them in a combination of lime juice and coconut milk, then I removed the chilies and mixed in some powdered sugar. The resulting glaze actually is quite spicy, but there’s so little glaze in each bite of cake that the heat is barely noticeable.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

I’m so glad that I decided to revisit this cake. I took some of it to work with me and let the compliments rain down upon me. I’m actually TERRIBLE at receiving compliments, unless they’re food related. “Moist!”, “Delicious!”, “Bursting with flavor!”. Keep ‘em coming folks!

The toasted coconut and coconut milk take center stage in this moist, delicious, bursting-with-flavor cake; and the lime juice and zest help to brighten things up and emphasize the tropical feeling. The crumb is soft and tender, thanks to the addition of corn starch, with a pleasant density indicative of any good bundt cake.

The glaze is fruity and tropical with a really interesting heat and flavor from the Thai bird’s beak chilies. If you aren’t feeling as frisky as I was, you can certainly leave the chilies out and this glaze recipe would still work really well. You could also swap them for a habanero if you want the heat but can’t find Thai chilies.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

I also want to mention that the pan I used to make this cake is the Nordic Ware Jubilee pan. I love the elegant curves and modern lines of this pan and it’s quickly become one of my favorite bundt shapes. If you’d like to get your hands on a Jubilee pan, check out my latest giveaway for a chance to win one of your very own! Sorry folks, this giveaway is only open to people with a mailing address in the US (within the contiguous 48). Good luck!

Make sure you keep scrolling down past the recipe to check out all the other amazing coconut creations everyone came up with this month. I’m drooling!

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

Toasted Coconut Lime Bundt Cake with Chili Lime Glaze

adapted from Taste and Tell

3 cups shredded sweetened coconut
1 cup butter, at room temperature
2½ cups granulated sugar
4 limes
3¼ cups all-purpose flour
⅓ cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon coconut extract
6 large eggs
1 (13.5 oz) can unsweetened coconut milk

2 cups powdered sugar
3 thai bird’s eye chilies *see note

Preheat oven to 350ºF. Grease and flour a 10 to 12 cup bundt pan.
Spread shredded coconut in an even layer on a sheet pan and toast until golden and fragrant, about 15 minutes. Check every few minutes and stir around if necessary to promote even toasting and prevent burning.
Zest and juice the limes. Reserve the juice and add the zest to the bowl of a stand mixer along with the softened butter and sugar. Cream on high speed until light and fluffy, about 3-5 minutes.
In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch, baking powder and salt.
With the mixer on low add the eggs, one at a time, along with the vanilla and coconut extract, scraping down the sides of the bowl after each addition.
In a small bowl, measure out and mix together 1 1/2 cups coconut milk and 1/4 cup lime juice. Reserve the remaining coconut milk and lime juice for the glaze. With the mixer on low, alternate additions of flour and coconut milk, starting and ending with flour.
Scrape the sides of the bowl and stir in 2 1/2 cups of the toasted coconut. Reserve remaining coconut for garnish. Pour the batter into the prepared bundt pan and level the batter with a spatula.
Bake in the center of the oven for about 60 to 65 minutes or until a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean. Cool the cake for 30 minutes, then turn out onto a cooling rack and cool until room temperature.

While the cake is baking, combine the remaining 1/4 cup lime juice and 1/4 cup coconut milk in a small saucepan. Remove the stems and slice the Thai chilies in half lengthwise. Add to the coconut lime liquid and place over a medium high flame just until the mixture comes to a low boil. Remove from heat and let steep while cake bakes and cools. Wash your hands well after handling the sliced chilies.
To make the glaze, strain the coconut lime chili liquid through a fine mesh strainer into a small bowl. Whisk in powdered sugar until smooth and free of lumps. Drizzle the glaze over the cooled cake and immediately sprinkle with remaining 1/2 cup of toasted coconut.

*cooks note: If you can’t find fresh Thai chilies, you may be able to find dried ones in the asian foods section. If that’s a no go, you can try using another type of very spicy chili, like a habanero, instead. I think 1 habanero chili would be enough. You could also skip them if you want.
Be sure to wash your hands well immediately after handling these extremely spicy chilies.

toasted coconut lime bundt cake with chili lime glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

Can you believe all these mouthwatering coconut cakes? I wish I could taste each and every one!

Almond Joy Bundtlettes from Sew You Think You Can Cook
Candy Bar Chocolate Coconut Bundt Cake from Love and Confections
Chocolate Italian Cake from Magnolia Days
Coconut & Banana Bundt Cake from Just One Bite Baking
Coconut Banana Bundt Cake from Basic N Delicious
Coconut Carrot Bundt Cake from Media Racion Doble, Por Favor
Coconut Cream Bundt Cake from Adventures in All Things Food
Coconut Hummingbird Bundt Cake from Patty’s Cake
Coconut Milk Bundt Cake from I Love Bundt Cakes
Coconut Milk Bundt Cake from Un Mordisco Un Pecado
Coconut Oil Pound Cake from The Spiced Life
Coconut Sugar Banana Cake from A Kingdom for a Cake
Cranberry and Coconut Bundt Cake from La Cocina de Aisha
Cranberry, Orange and Coconut Bundt Cake from Kids & Chic
German Chocolate Bundt Cake from The Freshman Cook
Glazed Chocolate Macaroon Bundt Cake from Food Lust People Love
Gluten-free Coconut Orange Bundt Cake with Coconut Whipped Cream from Cassie’s Kitchen
Gizzada Mini Bundts from Passion Kneaded
Key Lime and Chocolate Chip Bundt Cake from Eat, Drink and Be Mighty
Key Lime Coconut Cream Bundt from A Day in the Life on the Farm
Mini Samoa Bundt Cakes from Making Miracles
Orange & Coconut Bundt Cake from Living the Gourmet
Oreo Coconut Bundt Cake from Indian Curries/Stew
Pina Colada Bundt Cake from Jane’s Adventures in Dinner
Rhubarb n Rose Coconut Frosted Bundt Cake from Baking in Pyjamas
Rum Bundt Cake with Coconut and Lime from Bourbon and Brown Sugar
Toasted Coconut and Sweet Potato Bundt from Tea and Scones
Toasted Coconut Lime Bundt Cake with Chili Lime Glaze from Brooklyn Homemaker

BundtBakers

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Interested in learning more about us? #BundtBakers is a group of Bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake Bundts with a common ingredient or theme. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient. You can see all our of lovely Bundts by following our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated after each event on the BundtBaker home page here.

If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com. If you are just a lover of Bundt baking, you can find all of our recipe links by clicking our badge above or on our group Pinterest board.

Nordic Ware bundt pan giveaway!

UPDATE: CONTEST HAS ENDED! Winner will be contacted by email

Good news everyone!

Nordic Ware Jubilee bundt pan giveaway | Brooklyn Homemaker

The amazing folks at Nordic Ware have offered to giveaway one of their beautiful Jubilee bundt pans to a reader of Brooklyn Homemaker. Nordic Ware invented the bundt pan, and I use their heavy duty cast aluminum line of pans for all of my bundt baking adventures.

Nordic Ware Jubilee bundt pan giveaway | Brooklyn Homemaker

Nordic Ware has been around since 1947, and has been making all of their cookware right here in the US. If you want to know more about Nordic Ware and the birth story of the bundt pan, check out my the brief bundt history I posted back in July, along with my recipe for roasted cherry kugelhopf.

Nordic Ware Jubilee bundt pan giveaway | Brooklyn Homemaker

Not to toot my own horn, but I’ve been around the bundt baking block, and I have to say their pans are the absolute best! Their cast aluminum line is sturdy and heavy enough to bake really evenly, and I’ve never had any trouble with dry edges or over (or under) cooking in spots. Even though some of their bundt pans are very intricately designed, my cakes have always come out without a hitch, thanks to their excellent non-stick coating (along with a healthy coating of butter or cooking spray).

spiced harvest bundt cake with cream cheese glaze | Brooklyn Homemaker

The swirled diamond shape of the Jubilee bundt pan was inspired by the diamond jubilee, and the resulting pan has a gorgeous beauty that’s both modern and classic. Just to be sure that you fully comprehend the stunning good looks of this pan, I’m going to fill this post with my favorite photos of cakes I’ve baked in the Jubilee. The diamond shapes aren’t just there for looks either! They create little pockets in your cakes that collect soaks, glazes, and icings; resulting in cakes that are just as moist and delicious as they are beautiful!

honey glazed blackberry cornmeal bundt cake | Brooklyn Homemaker

If you like big bundts and you cannot lie, please check out the contest rules below, and comment on this post for your chance to win your very own Jubilee bundt pan from Nordic Ware!

So exciting!!!

Nordic Ware Jubilee bundt pan giveaway | Brooklyn Homemaker

Contest rules:

Entries will be accepted until, and contest will end on, Tuesday January 20th, at 6PM EST.

To enter, please follow these links and “like” both Brooklyn Homemaker and Nordic Ware on facebook. Then come back and leave the comment “I like big bundts!” on this post, and tell me what type of bundt you’ll bake first if you win!

Only one comment per entrant, please.  Sorry, but immediate family is excluded. The winning pan can only be shipped within the contiguous United States, so entrants must live or have a mailing address within the lower 48. Winner will be chosen, using a random number generator, from the total number of comments when the contest comes to a close. Winner will be contacted via email for shipping information.